Centre for African Studies (LUCAS)

General enquiries

Leeds University Centre for African Studies
c/o POLIS, Social Sciences Building, University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT

Tel: 0113 343 5069
african-studies@leeds.ac.uk

LUCAS Schools Project coordinator

Richard Borowski
R.Borowski@leeds.ac.uk

Remembering Darcus Howe – film showing of The Mangrove Nine

Remembering Darcus Howe film showing of The Mangrove Nine – Wednesday 28 June, 7.30pm Mandela Centre, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 3HY

Darcus Howe (1943-2017) was perhaps the most prominent radical black journalist and activist in the post-war period in the UK. He opened the Mandela Centre on Chapeltown Road in Leeds in 1984. This event will discuss his legacy for international politics today.

Darcus made a huge impact when he defended himself in court in 1971 on trumped-up charges against people supporting The Mangrove restaurant in Notting Hill. He became editor of the magazine Race Today in the early 1970s and co-edited (with Tariq Ali) Channel 4’s Bandung File in the 1980s. Later he presented the programme Devil’s Advocate and led documentaries on black Britain. He was a columnist for the New Statesman.

At this event a screening of the documentary film The Mangrove Nine (made by his comrades Franco Rossi and John la Rose, 1974) will be followed by a panel discussion led by Arthur France MBE. Arthur was a friend of Darcus’s. He was a leading figure in the Black Power movement in Leeds in the 1960s and 70s, a founder of the Leeds West Indian Carnival, and he continues to struggle for black people’s rights to justice, equality and education.

Robin Bunce, co-author of the official biography of Darcus Howe, will be on the panel. Details of his book are here http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/darcus-howe-9781849666510/

Darcus, like Arthur, was an advocate for the politics and art of the Trinidad carnival and this event will include a special calypso in tribute to Darcus Howe written by the famous calypsonian Alexander D Great.

The event is free, but a collection will be made. It is sponsored by Leeds Stand Up To Racism, Remember Oluwale, Conversations in Black History (Leeds University) and Leeds TUC.

https://www.facebook.com/events/235013870334194/

 

This entry was posted in Film, History, Leeds, LUCAS, Research, Symposium.

Lecturer in African Studies post at the University of Leeds

Lecturer in African Studies

Are you keen to contribute to the development of the North of England’s most vibrant interdisciplinary Centre for African Studies? Are you an academic with proven abilities to carry out research-led teaching in African History, Literary Studies, Politics or Religious Studies? Are you passionate about delivering an exceptional student experience in a research-intensive Russell Group University? Do you have an excellent research record and the potential to establish an international reputation?

As Lecturer, you will teach on Leeds University’s Centre for African Studies’ (LUCAS) existing interdisciplinary modules, and on modules within your host School. You will develop new modules, related to your research area, which will enhance the curriculum of your host School, and African Studies more broadly. You will be expected to contribute to LUCAS’s interdisciplinary research culture, through organising events, building relationships with partner organizations, and developing collaborative research funding applications. You will also contribute to the administration and management of LUCAS.

You will have a PhD in African History, Literary Studies, Global Development, International Relations, Politics or Religious Studies (or a related field) alongside a clear plan for future research including the pursuit of research grant income. You will have relevant teaching experience and an enthusiastic approach to teaching African Studies.

To explore the post further or for any queries you may have, please contact:

Dr Shane Doyle, Director of LUCAS

Tel: +44 (0)113 343 3655, email: s.d.doyle@leeds.ac.uk

 

Location:  Leeds – Main Campus
Faculty/Service:  Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Cultures
School/Institute:  Faculty Office
Category:  Academic
Grade:  Grade 7
Salary:  £34,956 to £38,183 p.a.
Working Time:  100%
Post Type:  Full Time
Contract Type:  Fixed Term (36 Months – due to external funding)
Closing Date:  Monday 10 July 2017
Reference:  AHCFO1010

For more information and to download the application forms please see here

https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=AHCFO1010

This entry was posted in Leeds, LUCAS, Research.

‘A Century of South African Writing’ with Niq Mhlongo

‘A Century of South African Writing’ with Niq Mhlongo: Lecture, reading and drinks reception

Thursday 29 June 2017, 5:15-7:00pm, 

Alumni Room, School of English, University of Leeds

For the final Postcolonial and World Literatures event of the year, we are delighted to welcome to Leeds South African writer Niq Mhlongo, author of Dog Eat Dog and Affluenza.  During his visit, Niq will deliver a lecture entitled, ‘A Century of South African Writing: Embedded tropes and emerging motifs in South African literature by black authors’ (the abstract for which can be found below). This will be followed by a reading and Q&A. Born in Soweto in 1973, Niq has been called, “one of the most high-spirited and irreverent new voices of South Africa’s post-apartheid literary scene”. All are welcome to attend. Please contact en11rejm@leeds.ac.uk if you have any queries or visit: https://leedspocoworldlit.wordpress.com.

This event is organised in association with International Writers at Leeds and the Leverhulme Trust project ‘Traumatic Pasts, Cosmopolitanism and Nation Building in German and South African Literature‘, led by Professor Stuart Taberner.

 

‘A Century of South African Writing: Embedded Tropes and Emerging Motifs in South African Literature by Black Authors’

Abstract 

One of South Africa’s leading scholars, author, and activist Es’kia Mphahlele argues that: “every writer is a product of his or her own history, and that the writer’s thoughts and feelings can be shaped by events and moments of world history whose impact registers on people as a world community. Thus South African writers cannot escape the influence of the global systems of communication or avoid the country’s historical realities.”

With this as a starting point, my presentation will focus on four periods that I suggest define or characterize the tropes and motifs in South African Literature written by black authors. Firstly, I will look at the period between 1910-1940 to talk about the land and dispossession motif. I will use Sol Plaatje’s Native Life in South Africa as an example of a fight against displacement in South African Literature by black authors. Secondly, I will talk about the Drum Era of between 1950-1960: a period of repressive apartheid laws. Here I will use the writings of Es’kia Mphahlele, Can Themba, Nat Nakasa as examples of literature that was inclined to reveal the atrocities committed against black people by the minority apartheid government. The third period is that of the Black Consciousness era of around 1960-1990. I will use the writings of Steve Biko, Matabane, and Wally Serote to show the importance of identity as a major theme during this period. To do this I will also talk about the protest literature that also emerged around that time. Lastly, I will discuss the post-apartheid period which is the generation that I belong to. This generation, liberated from apartheid, focus instead on the challenges that we are facing today in South Africa. I will discuss the themes that this generation of writers engage with, ranging from xenophobia, homophobia, unemployment, service delivery, racism, entrepreneurship, and corruption. I will also argue that themes of land and dispossession are recurring in today’s literature.

Niq Mhlongo was born in 1973 in Soweto, South Africa. He has a BA from the University of the Witwatersrand in African Literature and Political Studies and was a 2008 International Writing Program fellow at the University of Iowa. His first novel, Dog Eat Dog, was published by Kwela in 2004 and the Spanish edition was awarded the Mar de Letras prize. Mhlongo has presented his work at key African cultural venues, including the Caine Prize Workshop and the Zanzibar International Film Festival. His work has been translated into Spanish and Italian.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Leeds, Research.

Mandela – the legacy event – 8 July 2017


Mandela – the legacy – event at RJC Dance, Mandela Centre, Leeds, LS7 3HY Saturday 8 July, 2-4pm – for tickets and more info please contact stef@rjcdance.org.uk

This entry was posted in Concert, History, Leeds.

Jacqueline Rose and Chiara de Cesari speaking

Jacqueline Rose: “The Legacy” &

Chiara de Cesari: “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”

 

Wednesday 29 March 2017, Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, 5-6.30p.m

 

We are delighted to host Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck University, and Chiara de Cesari, Assistant Professor of European Studies and Cultural Studies at the University of Amsterdam. They will be speaking as part of the Sadler Seminar Series “Confronting Traumatic Pasts: Between the Local and the Global.” This is an interdisciplinary research initiative that investigates the memory cultures connecting us to traumatic historical events.

 

Jacqueline Rose will be speaking about the legacy of apartheid in contemporary South Africa:

 

What is the legacy of a brutal political past?  How does it pass down through the generations?  At a time of persistent, or even growing, race, gender and class discrimination and inequality, what does it mean to tell the young that they have been born free into a new world? In this lecture Jacqueline Rose turns to South Africa to argue that, far from lifting the weight of history, such expectations lay an impossible burden on the children of the nation. Drawing on the living archive of the recent University protests, on radical South African thinkers, alongside other voices from across the world who have struggled with a cruel history, she suggests that only a continuous reckoning with the past, however agonised, can forge a path towards a better, more just, future.

 

Chiara de Cesari will be speaking about “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”:

 

In this talk, I explore the peculiar history of museums in post-Oslo Palestine and especially the story of the Palestinian Museum. I explore the ways in which the Palestinian quasi-state, the Palestinian Authority, has tried but failed thus far to create a national museum as a key institution of national representation. Instead, Palestinian artists and cultural producers have experimented with different museum formats, creating virtual museums and nomadic museums in exile, thus producing national institutions in transnational spaces.

 

All are warmly invited.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Research, Seminars.

Debate – how fair is Fairtrade?

The Sustainability Services of the University and Commercial Services  are hosting an interesting debate on the fairness of Fairtrade.

It will be held this Thursday 9 March at 17:00 in the Parkinson Court (Parkinson Building). 

It will be an evening of informal interdisciplinary discussion about Fairtrade and its impact in the world. The fairness of Fairtrade will be examined from legal, economist and theological/philosophical perspectives, focusing on its impact in the Global South and the West. In light of International Women’s Day (8th of March), emphasis will be placed on Fairtrade’s impact on the lives of women.

The event is free and you can register here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fairtrade-debatespeaker-evening-how-fair-is-fairtrade-tickets-32527778461

This entry was posted in Leeds, Seminars.

LUCAS Bulletin 78

Exciting news – Leeds African Studies Bulletin 78 is back from the printers –  and is now online here – for a list of the contents see below:

Contents

Introduction                                                                                                          

Notes on Contributors                                                                                         

LUCAS News, Reports and People                                                                                                                                    

Departmental Reports

Articles                                                                                                               

  The Problem with Theatre for Development in contemporary Malawi              

Zindaba Chisiza

 

  The Conceptualisation of Women in the Islamist Discourse on Facebook in Tunisia

Manel Zouabi

 

  The Archetypal Search for Kainene: Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun, the Nigerian State and the Lost Biafran Dream

Abayomi Awelewa

 

  Re-thinking the Calabash; Yoruba Women as Containers: Deconstructing Gender in Yoruba Society Using the Calabash

as a Metaphor for Women as Containers of their own Gendered Identity

Emma Rice

 

Cities in Focus: Leeds and Africa

 The Leeds Black History Walk: An Interview with Joe Williams                        

Joe Williams and Christian Høgsbjerg

 

Materials relating to Africa at the Leeds Library                                              

Martin Banham

 

Why does a Nigerian Vagrant who drowned in Leeds, England, in 1969 Matter? Remembering David Oluwale

Max Farrar

 

Book Reviews                                                                                                           

Birth of a Dream Weaver. A Memoir of a Writer’s Awakening.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o. (Reviewed by Martin Banham)                                          

 

Migrants, Borders and Global Capitalism: West African labour mobility and EU borders. Hannah Cross.

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

African Migrations: Patterns and Perspectives.

Abdoulaye Kane and Todd H. Leedy (editors)

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

The Politics of Chieftaincy: Authority and Property in Colonial Ghana, 1920-1950. Naaborko Sackeyfio-Lenoch.

(Reviewed by John Nott)

This entry was posted in Journal, LUCAS, Research.

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture
THURSDAY 2 MARCH 2017 , 4.15pm – 5.45pm (followed by drinks)
Social Sciences Building 12/21-25
Nando Sigona, Within and Beyond Citizenship: Borders, Membership and Belonging
A book talk on the forthcoming volume from Routledge edited by Sigona with Roberto Gonzales
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Within-Beyond-Citizenship-membership-Sociological/dp/1138285528
Nando Sigona is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Policy at University of Birmingham, and deputy director of Institute for Research into Superdiversity. He is one of the editors of The Oxford Handbook on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (Oxford University Press, 2014) and author (with Alice Bloch and Roger Zetter) of Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Undocumented Migrants (Pluto Press, 2014).
On Within and Beyond Citizenship: “This tightly coordinated collection is, effectively, a handbook for the new critical migration studies. Working a rich seam of theoretical analyses on the ambiguities of societal membership faced by migrants and movers, the authors bring the everyday exclusions and resistances of the illegal, the transient and the precarious, to the centre of the very notion of citizenship. Chillingly, they show how, as a vector for sovereign power, national citizenship more often than not is a tool of differentiation, stratification and domination.” [blurb by Adrian Favell]
Co-sponsored with White Rose Research Network ‘Europe, Migration and the New Politics of (In)Security
https://newinsecurities.org/experiencing-insecurities/
(see here for more info on G

 

This entry was posted in Lecture, Leeds, Research.

Nigerian Voices project – Bradford

Nigerian Voices project – Bradford

There is an exciting heritage project taking place in Bradford led by New Leaders Network in collaboration with Nigeria Community Association Bradford. The Nigerian Voices Project unveils the experience of Nigerian elders arriving in Bradford in the 1950s, 60’s and 70’s sharing their experience of arrival, settling down and housing, education and employment. The project will be celebrated at a community event taking place 25.03.2017 at Carlisle Business Centre, Bradford. We produced a 40 minute film and a book with input from the elders, young people and a local historian Joe Williams (Heritage Corner) which capture these experiences which will be available to purchase at the event.

You can book your tickets here: http://www.nigerianvoiceslaunchevent.eventbrite.com/

If you have any questions, or would like further information please contact info@newleadersnetwork.org.uk

This entry was posted in Exhibition, History.

YASN Conference – Migration and Transition – Roots and Routes

Yorkshire African Studies Network conference

Migration and Transition – Roots and Routes

Larkin Theatre A, Larkin Building, University of Hull, 18th and 19th May 2017

The main theme of the conference is Migration and Transition – Roots and Routes

This 2 day interdisciplinary conference aims to create an inclusive and supportive space for post-graduate scholars, academics and community members to come together in a supportive environment, to provide a platform of critical thinking, exchange of ideas and to promote inter-relationships between academics, researchers, the community and non-academics. .

The conference provides an opportunity for academics and professionals from various fields to share their theoretical knowledge, research findings and practices with colleagues, participants and community members in a relaxed and stimulating atmosphere. Participants’ input will be encouraged in order to add value and interaction, promote networking and foster partnerships throughout the duration of the conference. The conference will be interactive, providing an excellent opportunity for networking.

The main theme of the conference is Migration and Transition – Roots and Routes

Programme

18th May Thursday

9.30     Register

10.15   Keynote: Dr Lucy Michael – hate crime and discussion

  1. 00 Frowynke Siegers: Community Development & Volunteer Coordinator Gateway   Protection Programme – Refugee Council – talk of work with refugees and case studies
  2. 30 Lunch

1.30      Lilly Okech-Appiah: The Human Trafficking of young girls and women from      Eastern Africa to Europe

1.45      Giselle Lowe: A qualitative exploration of abortion narratives in South Africa

2.00      Discussion

2.15      Keynote: Dr Athina Karatogianni Africa/ social media and discussion

3.00      Tea/coffee

3.15      Samuel North: Museums as a form of restorative justice: reality or rhetoric in South Africa?

3.30       Dr Michele Olivier: Forced Marriages: A modern form of slavery?

4.00       Nkiruka U Maduekwe: Enforcing Environmental Rights in Nigeria: Is there an African Solution to this Nigerian Problem?

4.15 – 4.45 Discussion

4.45 -5.45 Roundtable YASN discussion

6 – 7/8    Film: Talk by Tom Glinski – Community Development Worker Centre 88

Film made by refugees Centre 88 – Refugee Council

19th May Friday

10       Coffee/Tea

10.30  Claire Chambers: ‘Like a New Titanic’: Muslim Refugee Fiction

11.00  Shriya Thakkar: Labour Migration and Gender Roles: A South Asian Perspective

11.15  Discussion

11.30  Dr Shola: Boko Haram

12.00  Allison Drew: Conflict patterns in Africa

12.30 Dr Bev Orton: Decriminalising Sex Workers in South Africa

1.00 Discussion/ plenary

1.30   Lunch

2.30 Possible screening of film on Rwanda

PM Visit to WISE/ Hull/ art exhibitions on campus and in town

For more info and to register – please contact Dr Bev Orton: b.orton@hull.ac.uk

Please find below directions to the University of Hull

Directions

http://beta.www.hull.ac.uk/Choose-Hull/Study-at-Hull/Open-days/Visit-us.aspx

Here are some events taking place in Hull – City of Culture

https://www.hull2017.co.uk/whatson/

In the afternoon of 19th May you are welcome to join a trip to WISE and visit the museum

http://www2.hull.ac.uk/fass/wise.aspx

PLEASE NOTE THAT COFFEE AND TEA WILL BE SUPPLIED – HOWEVER LUNCH AND DINNER WILL NEED TO BE AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE (THERE WILL BE SANDWICHES AND CAKES!)

This entry was posted in Conferences, YASN.

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