Centre for African Studies (LUCAS)

General enquiries

Leeds University Centre for African Studies
c/o POLIS,
Social Sciences Building,
University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT

Tel: 0113 343 5069
african-studies@leeds.ac.uk

LUCAS Schools Project coordinator

Richard Borowski
R.Borowski@leeds.ac.uk

Journal

LUCAS Bulletin 78

Exciting news – Leeds African Studies Bulletin 78 is back from the printers –  and is now online here – for a list of the contents see below:

Contents

Introduction                                                                                                          

Notes on Contributors                                                                                         

LUCAS News, Reports and People                                                                                                                                    

Departmental Reports

Articles                                                                                                               

  The Problem with Theatre for Development in contemporary Malawi              

Zindaba Chisiza

 

  The Conceptualisation of Women in the Islamist Discourse on Facebook in Tunisia

Manel Zouabi

 

  The Archetypal Search for Kainene: Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun, the Nigerian State and the Lost Biafran Dream

Abayomi Awelewa

 

  Re-thinking the Calabash; Yoruba Women as Containers: Deconstructing Gender in Yoruba Society Using the Calabash

as a Metaphor for Women as Containers of their own Gendered Identity

Emma Rice

 

Cities in Focus: Leeds and Africa

 The Leeds Black History Walk: An Interview with Joe Williams                        

Joe Williams and Christian Høgsbjerg

 

Materials relating to Africa at the Leeds Library                                              

Martin Banham

 

Why does a Nigerian Vagrant who drowned in Leeds, England, in 1969 Matter? Remembering David Oluwale

Max Farrar

 

Book Reviews                                                                                                           

Birth of a Dream Weaver. A Memoir of a Writer’s Awakening.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o. (Reviewed by Martin Banham)                                          

 

Migrants, Borders and Global Capitalism: West African labour mobility and EU borders. Hannah Cross.

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

African Migrations: Patterns and Perspectives.

Abdoulaye Kane and Todd H. Leedy (editors)

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

The Politics of Chieftaincy: Authority and Property in Colonial Ghana, 1920-1950. Naaborko Sackeyfio-Lenoch.

(Reviewed by John Nott)

This entry was posted in Journal, LUCAS, Research.

Leeds African Studies Bulletin 77 – list of contents

Leeds African Studies Bulletin
Number 77 Winter 2015-16

Contents
Introduction
Notes on Contributors
LUCAS News, Reports and People
The LUCAS Book Distribution Scheme
LUCAS Seminars
The LUCAS Schools Project
Yorkshire African Studies Network

Departmental Reports
School of Earth and Environment
School of English/Workshop Theatre
School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies
School of History
School of Languages, Cultures and Societies
School of Media and Communication
Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development
School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science
School of Politics and International Studies

Tribute

Professor Vic Allen (by Alex Beresford)

Articles 

Narcissus and Other Pall-Bearers: Morbidity as Ideology
Wole Soyinka

Thabo Mbeki’s AIDS denialism: Neoliberalism, government 
and civil society in South Africa
Emma Camp

Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs) in Somalia 
since the End of the Cold War: Historical and Theoretical Implications
Jethro Norman

Remembering the Fifth Pan-African Congress 
Christian Høgsbjerg

Book Reviews

Building a Peaceful Nation: Julius Nyerere and the establishment of
sovereignty in Tanzania, 1960-1964. Paul Bjerk.
(Reviewed by Jane Plastow)

Achebe and Friends at Umuahia: The Making of a Literary Elite.
Terri Ochiagha,
(Reviewed by Jane Plastow)

Mandela: My prisoner, My friend. Christo Brand with Barbara Jones.
(Reviewed by Ruth Daly)

Zimbabwe: challenging the stereotypes. Robert Mshengu Kavanagh.
(Reviewed by Jack Mapanje)

Blood on the Tides: The Ozidi Saga and Oral Epic Narratology.
Isidore Okpewho.
(Reviewed by Rachel Bower)

[This issue of the Bulletin is now uploaded online – see here – for more info or to propose contributions for future volumes please email african-studies@leeds.ac.uk]

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Review of African Political Economy Online

Check out the great new ROAPE Online website, which has analysis of contemporary developments in Africa as well as details of scholarships, funding opportunities etc – including the Lionel Cliffe Memorial Research Scholarship

Since 1974 the Review of African Political Economy has provided radical analysis of trends, issues and social processes in Africa, adopting a broadly materialist interpretation of change. Established by a group of scholars and activists in the UK and Africa, the journal is committed to understanding projects of radical transformation…Together with the print journal, ROAPE Online seeks to develop a critique of the existing balance of class and social forces in African political economy as a vital part of the project of radical political, environmental and economic transformation. ROAPE’s online platform keeps the struggles for racial, gender and economic equality at the centre of our focus. We do not seek to become a substitute for African voices, but a sounding board and platform for them.

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Francophone African Philosophy and the Aftermath of the Empire

International Journal of Francophone Studies

Volume 18 Numbers 2&3 2015

Francophone African Philosophy and the Aftermath of the Empire

Guest edited by Pierre-Philippe Fraiture (University of Warwick)

This monumental volume brings together a roster of international scholars from Africa, North America, the United Kingdom, France and India, to critically examine philosophical practices in Francophone Africa since the late 1930s. Whether or not ‘African philosophy’ can be defined as an autonomous discipline, whether or not philosophy can be restricted by geography (Crépon 1996), there is no doubt that ‘philosophising’ has always taken place in Africa. It has in the past forty years generated interest, particularly in the North-American academia, favouring the analytic approach over those usually adhered to in the ‘continental’ tradition. The Francophone input is often mentioned superficially in the English-language corpus. This volume aims to correct this imbalance by looking at the overlapping concerns of various schools of thought. The scope here is wide-ranging, testing out the regional and linguistic boundaries of ‘African Francophone philosophy’. It demonstrates that this field has been supported by figures cutting across conventional racial divides, with an ability to move beyond the Francophone / Anglophone demarcation line and reconnect with canonical Western philosophies.

Contributions

Introduction. “African Philosophy and Francophone Cultures: chronological perspectives” (Pierre-Philippe Fraiture); “Colonial Ethnography as a Strategy for Self-Writing: the case of Paul Hazoumé’s Doguicimi (1938)” (Kusum Aggarwal); “Les Statues meurent aussi’: the death and after-death of African art” (Pierre-Philippe Fraiture); “L’usage de l’Antiquité chez Cheikh Anta Diop et l’ombre menaçante de Senghor” (Bernard Mouralis); “Oedipus in Africa: Mudimbe and Classical Antiquity” (Daniel Orrells); “On the Predicament of Africanist Knowledge: Mudimbe, Gnosis and the challenge of the Colonial Library” (Zubairu Wai); “L’Afrique dans le monde, le monde depuis l’Afrique: lectures croisées d’Achille Mbembe et de Célestin Monga” (Anthony Mangeon); “Reconstruire la philosophie africaine: à la recherche des lieux d’ancrage d’une pensée du futur” (Kasereka Kavwahirehi); “The Equivocal Concept: the work of Bourahima Ouattara” (Jean-Paul Martinon); “The Singer of Pain: suffering and subversion in the poetry of Sando Marteau” (Alena Rettová); “‘Philosophie africaine’: histoire d’une expression” (Souleymane Bachir Diagne)

Founder and Editor-in-Chief: Kamal Salhi (University of Leeds) International Journal of Francophone Studies

 

 

 

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