Centre for African Studies (LUCAS)

General enquiries

Leeds University Centre for African Studies
c/o POLIS,
Social Sciences Building,
University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT

Tel: 0113 343 5069
african-studies@leeds.ac.uk

LUCAS Schools Project coordinator

Richard Borowski
R.Borowski@leeds.ac.uk

Lecture

‘A Century of South African Writing’ with Niq Mhlongo

———– NOW UNFORTUNATELY CANCELLED ———

‘A Century of South African Writing’ with Niq Mhlongo: Lecture, reading and drinks reception

Originally – Thursday 29 June 2017 – now postponed due to visa issues

For the final Postcolonial and World Literatures event of the year, we are delighted to welcome to Leeds South African writer Niq Mhlongo, author of Dog Eat Dog and Affluenza.  During his visit, Niq will deliver a lecture entitled, ‘A Century of South African Writing: Embedded tropes and emerging motifs in South African literature by black authors’ (the abstract for which can be found below). This will be followed by a reading and Q&A. Born in Soweto in 1973, Niq has been called, “one of the most high-spirited and irreverent new voices of South Africa’s post-apartheid literary scene”. All are welcome to attend. Please contact en11rejm@leeds.ac.uk if you have any queries or visit: https://leedspocoworldlit.wordpress.com.

This event is organised in association with International Writers at Leeds and the Leverhulme Trust project ‘Traumatic Pasts, Cosmopolitanism and Nation Building in German and South African Literature‘, led by Professor Stuart Taberner.

 

‘A Century of South African Writing: Embedded Tropes and Emerging Motifs in South African Literature by Black Authors’

Abstract 

One of South Africa’s leading scholars, author, and activist Es’kia Mphahlele argues that: “every writer is a product of his or her own history, and that the writer’s thoughts and feelings can be shaped by events and moments of world history whose impact registers on people as a world community. Thus South African writers cannot escape the influence of the global systems of communication or avoid the country’s historical realities.”

With this as a starting point, my presentation will focus on four periods that I suggest define or characterize the tropes and motifs in South African Literature written by black authors. Firstly, I will look at the period between 1910-1940 to talk about the land and dispossession motif. I will use Sol Plaatje’s Native Life in South Africa as an example of a fight against displacement in South African Literature by black authors. Secondly, I will talk about the Drum Era of between 1950-1960: a period of repressive apartheid laws. Here I will use the writings of Es’kia Mphahlele, Can Themba, Nat Nakasa as examples of literature that was inclined to reveal the atrocities committed against black people by the minority apartheid government. The third period is that of the Black Consciousness era of around 1960-1990. I will use the writings of Steve Biko, Matabane, and Wally Serote to show the importance of identity as a major theme during this period. To do this I will also talk about the protest literature that also emerged around that time. Lastly, I will discuss the post-apartheid period which is the generation that I belong to. This generation, liberated from apartheid, focus instead on the challenges that we are facing today in South Africa. I will discuss the themes that this generation of writers engage with, ranging from xenophobia, homophobia, unemployment, service delivery, racism, entrepreneurship, and corruption. I will also argue that themes of land and dispossession are recurring in today’s literature.

Niq Mhlongo was born in 1973 in Soweto, South Africa. He has a BA from the University of the Witwatersrand in African Literature and Political Studies and was a 2008 International Writing Program fellow at the University of Iowa. His first novel, Dog Eat Dog, was published by Kwela in 2004 and the Spanish edition was awarded the Mar de Letras prize. Mhlongo has presented his work at key African cultural venues, including the Caine Prize Workshop and the Zanzibar International Film Festival. His work has been translated into Spanish and Italian.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Leeds, Research.

Jacqueline Rose and Chiara de Cesari speaking

Jacqueline Rose: “The Legacy” &

Chiara de Cesari: “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”

 

Wednesday 29 March 2017, Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, 5-6.30p.m

 

We are delighted to host Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck University, and Chiara de Cesari, Assistant Professor of European Studies and Cultural Studies at the University of Amsterdam. They will be speaking as part of the Sadler Seminar Series “Confronting Traumatic Pasts: Between the Local and the Global.” This is an interdisciplinary research initiative that investigates the memory cultures connecting us to traumatic historical events.

 

Jacqueline Rose will be speaking about the legacy of apartheid in contemporary South Africa:

 

What is the legacy of a brutal political past?  How does it pass down through the generations?  At a time of persistent, or even growing, race, gender and class discrimination and inequality, what does it mean to tell the young that they have been born free into a new world? In this lecture Jacqueline Rose turns to South Africa to argue that, far from lifting the weight of history, such expectations lay an impossible burden on the children of the nation. Drawing on the living archive of the recent University protests, on radical South African thinkers, alongside other voices from across the world who have struggled with a cruel history, she suggests that only a continuous reckoning with the past, however agonised, can forge a path towards a better, more just, future.

 

Chiara de Cesari will be speaking about “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”:

 

In this talk, I explore the peculiar history of museums in post-Oslo Palestine and especially the story of the Palestinian Museum. I explore the ways in which the Palestinian quasi-state, the Palestinian Authority, has tried but failed thus far to create a national museum as a key institution of national representation. Instead, Palestinian artists and cultural producers have experimented with different museum formats, creating virtual museums and nomadic museums in exile, thus producing national institutions in transnational spaces.

 

All are warmly invited.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Research, Seminars.

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture
THURSDAY 2 MARCH 2017 , 4.15pm – 5.45pm (followed by drinks)
Social Sciences Building 12/21-25
Nando Sigona, Within and Beyond Citizenship: Borders, Membership and Belonging
A book talk on the forthcoming volume from Routledge edited by Sigona with Roberto Gonzales
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Within-Beyond-Citizenship-membership-Sociological/dp/1138285528
Nando Sigona is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Policy at University of Birmingham, and deputy director of Institute for Research into Superdiversity. He is one of the editors of The Oxford Handbook on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (Oxford University Press, 2014) and author (with Alice Bloch and Roger Zetter) of Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Undocumented Migrants (Pluto Press, 2014).
On Within and Beyond Citizenship: “This tightly coordinated collection is, effectively, a handbook for the new critical migration studies. Working a rich seam of theoretical analyses on the ambiguities of societal membership faced by migrants and movers, the authors bring the everyday exclusions and resistances of the illegal, the transient and the precarious, to the centre of the very notion of citizenship. Chillingly, they show how, as a vector for sovereign power, national citizenship more often than not is a tool of differentiation, stratification and domination.” [blurb by Adrian Favell]
Co-sponsored with White Rose Research Network ‘Europe, Migration and the New Politics of (In)Security
https://newinsecurities.org/experiencing-insecurities/
(see here for more info on G

 

This entry was posted in Lecture, Leeds, Research.

LUCAS Spring Term seminar series 2017

LUCAS Seminar Series Spring 2017– all welcome, no need to book in advance

Conversations in Black History – Remembering Christopher and David
LUCAS is supporting a new series in conjunction with Leeds West Indian Centre Charitable Trust and the School of History at the University of Leeds, ‘Conversations in Black History’, and its inaugural event is ‘Remembering Christopher and David: Justice and Police Brutality in Yorkshire’, with campaigner Janet Alder and the Remember David Oluwale Campaign. It takes place on Wednesday 1 February, at 6pm, Leeds West Indian Centre.

Remembering Christopher and David

Prof. Rijk van Dijk (ASCL, Leiden University/ AISSR, Univ. of Amsterdam/ Centre of Excellence, Univ. of Konstanz)‘Pentecostalism and Pre-marital Counselling in Africa: A Case of Religious Sophistication?’.
Tuesday 7 February, 5pm, venue: Baines Wing SR (1.13)
(Co-sponsored by the Centre for Religion and Public Life)

Prof Rijk van Dijk on ‘Pentecostalism and Pre-marital Counselling in Africa’

Jörg Wiegratz (University of Leeds), ‘Neoliberal Moral Economy: Capitalism, Socio-Cultural Change and Fraud in Uganda’
Tuesday 28 February, 4.30pm–6pm, Michael Sadler Building, University of Leeds, LG 19
Co-sponsored by the Review of African Political Economy

Jörg Wiegratz on Neoliberal Moral Economy in Uganda

LUCAS Annual Lecture, 2016-2017
Professor Nic Cheeseman (University of Birmingham) will speak on
Elections and Political Change in Africa: The Case of Kenya 2017
Thursday 16 March 2017, 4.30pm, Clothworkers South Building Lecture Theatre 2

LUCAS Annual Lecture with Professor Nic Cheeseman

Truth for Giulio, Justice for Egypt’s Disappeared
LUCAS are proud to be joining with Leeds University and College’s Union (UCU) and Amnesty to sponsor an Egypt Solidarity Initiative event to campaign for truth for Giulio Regeni in Leeds.
Wednesday 22 March, 1 – 2.30pm, Roger Stevens Building, Lecture Theatre 1, University of Leeds
Speakers: Shane Enright (Amnesty UK’s trade union campaigner), Professor Ray Bush (University of Leeds)

Truth for Giulio, Justice for Egypt’s Disappeared

This entry was posted in Book Launch, History, Lecture, Leeds, LUCAS, Seminars.

US Slavery and Yorkshire Anti-Slavery – forgotten narratives from the Leeds Archive

Leeds Being Human Festival 2016, Journeys of Hope and Fear – “US Slavery and Yorkshire Anti-Slavery: forgotten Narratives from the Leeds Archive”.

A country wide event in conjunction with University of Leeds and Joe Williams of Heritage Corner.  17th – 25th November 2016

If you were living in Leeds in the 1840s and 1850s you would undoubtedly have heard of the anti-slavery speeches made to huge local audiences by African American activists and their supporters. We start with a guided walk in which you will visit sites associated with the entwined histories of African self-emancipation and anti-slavery activism in nineteenth-century Leeds. After this, there will be a public discussion at the University of Leeds on the significance of the archives of anti-slavery activism. Finally, there will be a chance to visit the Leeds Library, founded in 1768. There you can see an exhibition from the Leeds Library’s collections on activist, onetime library member and Quaker businessman Wilson Armistead (1819-1868), and other Leeds abolitionists. Enjoy a play tracing the extraordinary escape, from enslavement in Georgia, of Ellen and William Craft. The couple were each listed in the 1851 census as a ‘fugitive slave’ when they were hosted by Armistead in his home in Leeds. They went on to publish an acclaimed book, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860).

The guided walk, public lecture and play “Meet the Crafts” will all take place on 23rd November:

The guided walk is from 1.15-3.15 setting off from the steps of the Parkinson building, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, LS2 9JT.

The public lecture will be at the University of Leeds, from 4.00-5.30pm.

“Meet the Crafts” will be performed at the Leeds Library, 18 Commercial Street, Leeds, LS1 6AL. The performance will start at 7.00pm and last for approximately one hour.

All the events are free and open to the public, but booking is essential. To book a place please contact counter@theleedslibrary.org.uk or telephone 0113 2453071.

 

This entry was posted in History, Lecture, Research, Theatre.

​A Better Life for All? Power, Politics and the Past in South Africa

A Better Life for All? Power, Politics and the Past in South Africa

Friday 23 September. 7.30pm – Howard Assembly Rooms, Leeds – to book tickets see here:

https://www.operanorth.co.uk/productions/nicholas-wolpe

On 11 July 1963, police raided Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia, South Africa and arrested the high command of the ANC’s armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe.

At the resulting Rivonia Trial, eight men, including Nelson Mandela, were sentenced to life in prison.

Nicholas Wolpe is the founder of the Liliesleaf Trust and son of prominent anti-apartheid activist Harold Wolpe, who was arrested at Liliesleaf. This autumn, he offers his powerful insight on both this decisive era for South Africa and the political crisis the country finds itself in today, more than 20 years after the first free elections.

Part of Liberty Lectures 2017, in association with the University of Leeds

This entry was posted in History, Lecture, Leeds.

Leeds Migration Research Network (LMRN) launch

Leeds Migration Research Network: Launch Event

Thursday 9 Jun at 4pm, University of Leeds

The University of Leeds Migration Research Network would like to invite you to our launch event, involving a public lecture and drinks reception. Please note you need to book a place should you wish to attend (free of charge) so please click on the eventbrite link below. All welcome.

Public lecture: Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration

Professor Bridget Anderson

Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford

Thursday June 9 2016

16:00-17:30 (followed by drinks reception)

Leeds University Business School, Maurice Keyworth Building, Lecture Theatre G.02  –  LS6 1AN

Please book your place (FREE) at: leedsmigrationlaunchevent.eventbrite.co.uk

At this launch event for the Leeds Migration Research Network (LMRN), Professor Bridget Anderson from the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford will present the following lecture: ‘Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration’. The talk will be followed by a drinks reception.

Building on inter-disciplinary expertise and interest in migration across the University of Leeds, LMRN is responding to the widespread interest in migration in the region and beyond, including government, business, and civil society groups. LMRN develops and promotes research around migration, and also deepens links with external organisations by acting as a contact point and source of expertise, and through the development of bottom-up collaborative engagement.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Research.

Slave Rebellions or Actions of War? Understanding West African Armed Resistance in Bahia and Cuba, 1807-1844 – Manuel Barcia

Professor Manuel Barcia’s Inaugural Lecture.

"Slave Rebellions or Actions of War

Date: 10-03-2016
Time: 17:00 – 18:00

This lecture will examine how a series of historical events that occurred in West Africa from the mid-1790s – including Afonja’s rebellion, the Owu wars, the Fulani-led jihad, and the migrations to Egbaland – had an impact upon life in cities and plantations in Bahia, Brazil and western Cuba during the first half of the nineteenth century. Why did these two geographical areas serve as the theatre for the uprising of the Nagos, the Lucumis, and other West African men and women? To understand why these two areas followed such similar social patterns it is essential to look across the Atlantic and to centre the focus on the African side of the story. The lecture will also raise the broader issue of how can American, Latin American and Caribbean historians make a better use of African history and historical sources to illuminate their subjects of study.

The lecture will be followed by a reception at The Terrace Bar from 6pm to 8pm. Please RSVP to LCSResearch@leeds.ac.uk  for catering purposes.

Location: Clothworkers South Lecture Theatre 3
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/events/event/3121/slave_rebellions_or_actions_of_war_understanding_west_african_armed_resistance_in_bahia_and_cuba_1807-1844

This entry was posted in Lecture, LUCAS, Research.

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