Centre for African Studies (LUCAS)

General enquiries

Leeds University Centre for African Studies
c/o POLIS, Social Sciences Building, University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT

Tel: 0113 343 5069
african-studies@leeds.ac.uk

LUCAS Schools Project coordinator

Richard Borowski
R.Borowski@leeds.ac.uk

Research

Jacqueline Rose and Chiara de Cesari speaking

Jacqueline Rose: “The Legacy” &

Chiara de Cesari: “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”

 

Wednesday 29 March 2017, Clothworkers Centenary Concert Hall, 5-6.30p.m

 

We are delighted to host Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck University, and Chiara de Cesari, Assistant Professor of European Studies and Cultural Studies at the University of Amsterdam. They will be speaking as part of the Sadler Seminar Series “Confronting Traumatic Pasts: Between the Local and the Global.” This is an interdisciplinary research initiative that investigates the memory cultures connecting us to traumatic historical events.

 

Jacqueline Rose will be speaking about the legacy of apartheid in contemporary South Africa:

 

What is the legacy of a brutal political past?  How does it pass down through the generations?  At a time of persistent, or even growing, race, gender and class discrimination and inequality, what does it mean to tell the young that they have been born free into a new world? In this lecture Jacqueline Rose turns to South Africa to argue that, far from lifting the weight of history, such expectations lay an impossible burden on the children of the nation. Drawing on the living archive of the recent University protests, on radical South African thinkers, alongside other voices from across the world who have struggled with a cruel history, she suggests that only a continuous reckoning with the past, however agonised, can forge a path towards a better, more just, future.

 

Chiara de Cesari will be speaking about “Impossible Memories: On the Predicament of Creating Palestinian National Museums”:

 

In this talk, I explore the peculiar history of museums in post-Oslo Palestine and especially the story of the Palestinian Museum. I explore the ways in which the Palestinian quasi-state, the Palestinian Authority, has tried but failed thus far to create a national museum as a key institution of national representation. Instead, Palestinian artists and cultural producers have experimented with different museum formats, creating virtual museums and nomadic museums in exile, thus producing national institutions in transnational spaces.

 

All are warmly invited.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Research, Seminars.

LUCAS Bulletin 78

Exciting news – Leeds African Studies Bulletin 78 is back from the printers –  and is now online here – for a list of the contents see below:

Contents

Introduction                                                                                                          

Notes on Contributors                                                                                         

LUCAS News, Reports and People                                                                                                                                    

Departmental Reports

Articles                                                                                                               

  The Problem with Theatre for Development in contemporary Malawi              

Zindaba Chisiza

 

  The Conceptualisation of Women in the Islamist Discourse on Facebook in Tunisia

Manel Zouabi

 

  The Archetypal Search for Kainene: Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun, the Nigerian State and the Lost Biafran Dream

Abayomi Awelewa

 

  Re-thinking the Calabash; Yoruba Women as Containers: Deconstructing Gender in Yoruba Society Using the Calabash

as a Metaphor for Women as Containers of their own Gendered Identity

Emma Rice

 

Cities in Focus: Leeds and Africa

 The Leeds Black History Walk: An Interview with Joe Williams                        

Joe Williams and Christian Høgsbjerg

 

Materials relating to Africa at the Leeds Library                                              

Martin Banham

 

Why does a Nigerian Vagrant who drowned in Leeds, England, in 1969 Matter? Remembering David Oluwale

Max Farrar

 

Book Reviews                                                                                                           

Birth of a Dream Weaver. A Memoir of a Writer’s Awakening.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o. (Reviewed by Martin Banham)                                          

 

Migrants, Borders and Global Capitalism: West African labour mobility and EU borders. Hannah Cross.

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

African Migrations: Patterns and Perspectives.

Abdoulaye Kane and Todd H. Leedy (editors)

(Reviewed by Peter Lawrence)

 

The Politics of Chieftaincy: Authority and Property in Colonial Ghana, 1920-1950. Naaborko Sackeyfio-Lenoch.

(Reviewed by John Nott)

This entry was posted in Journal, LUCAS, Research.

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture

Leeds Migration Research Network Annual Invited Lecture
THURSDAY 2 MARCH 2017 , 4.15pm – 5.45pm (followed by drinks)
Social Sciences Building 12/21-25
Nando Sigona, Within and Beyond Citizenship: Borders, Membership and Belonging
A book talk on the forthcoming volume from Routledge edited by Sigona with Roberto Gonzales
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Within-Beyond-Citizenship-membership-Sociological/dp/1138285528
Nando Sigona is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Policy at University of Birmingham, and deputy director of Institute for Research into Superdiversity. He is one of the editors of The Oxford Handbook on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (Oxford University Press, 2014) and author (with Alice Bloch and Roger Zetter) of Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Undocumented Migrants (Pluto Press, 2014).
On Within and Beyond Citizenship: “This tightly coordinated collection is, effectively, a handbook for the new critical migration studies. Working a rich seam of theoretical analyses on the ambiguities of societal membership faced by migrants and movers, the authors bring the everyday exclusions and resistances of the illegal, the transient and the precarious, to the centre of the very notion of citizenship. Chillingly, they show how, as a vector for sovereign power, national citizenship more often than not is a tool of differentiation, stratification and domination.” [blurb by Adrian Favell]
Co-sponsored with White Rose Research Network ‘Europe, Migration and the New Politics of (In)Security
https://newinsecurities.org/experiencing-insecurities/
(see here for more info on G

 

This entry was posted in Lecture, Leeds, Research.

CfP: Symposium on Foreign Aid and Journalism in Latin America and Africa

Symposium on Foreign Aid and Journalism in Latin America and Africa: Developing a Research Agenda

Leeds, UK – April 20, 2017

Call for Papers

Objective: This symposium will examine the influence and impact over the years of foreign aid on journalism practice and education. In so doing, it aims at developing a research agenda to examine issues and problems arising from the intersection between journalism, foreign aid, public diplomacy and foreign policy in historical and current contexts. Although the geographical focus is Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, we will welcome scholarly contributions from other areas of the Global South. The format of the event is explorative and therefore full papers are not necessary at this stage. The idea is to discover opportunities for collaborative research including joint research grants and publications as well as other types of exchanges.

The symposium connects to the initial meeting of the AHRC / DfID funded Research Network “Development Assistance and independent journalism in Africa and Latin America”.

Questions that the project aims at addressing include (but are not limited to)

  • What has been the role of international development assistance in shaping journalistic approaches and practices in Africa and Latin America and what are the consequences?
  • What is the existing body of research concerning this issue?
  • What has been the role of development assistance in shaping journalism education in Africa and Latin America?
  • To what extent has international development assistance fostered or inhibited independent journalism in Africa and Latin America?
  • What are the similarities and differences in the direct and indirect impacts of development assistance of journalism from the US, UK and other donors?
  • What are the continuities and discontinuities concerning the impact of development assistance on journalism practice and education in the post-Cold War era?
  • How has international development assistance either directly or indirectly affecting journalism been perceived by journalists, politicians and the general public in the beneficiary countries?
  • What interventions could be developed to counter any negative consequences of these traditions?

Planned outcomes:

  • Edited Special Issue of a Journal
  • Edited collection of essays in a book.
  • Joint grant applications
  • Collaborative PhD scholarships

Convenors: Dr Jairo Lugo-Ocando & Dr. Chris Paterson, School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds

Send abstracts to: c.paterson@leeds.ac.uk

Deadline for 300-words abstracts and title: February 20, 2017

Please register here: https://ajn-symposium.eventbrite.co.uk

This entry was posted in Conferences, Leeds, Research, Symposium.

CfP: RiDNet conference 2017 at the University of Leeds

The Researchers in Development Network at the University of Leeds is excited to announce the 5th Annual RiDNet conference

“I, Researcher: exploring the research experience – context, self and interdisciplinary practice”

The conference will take place on the 27th of January, 2017 at the School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds. Please see attached poster for further details.

This year, we’re aiming to explore the experience of conducting research. The conference will focus on three themes (explained below) and we encourage researchers to submit invite PhD and Early Career researchers to submit abstracts reflecting on their experiences of conducting research within and related to (1) different contexts; (2) other disciplines; and (3) self

Conference Themes:

  1.   Context: This theme examines how different, often challenging contexts can impact upon your research, and how you may take this into consideration.

Topics may include: researcher positionality, ethics, reflexivity, avoiding an extractive relationship with the research context and managing participants expectations.

  1.   Self: This theme examines the less frequently discussed aspect of emotional well-being whilst conducting research.

Topics may include: emotional wellbeing during a  PhD, staying safe, balancing being a good researcher with staying healthy, handling isolation, loneliness, and culture shock.

  1.   Interdisciplinary practice: This theme examines how research may cross different disciplines, and how this may impact research design, methods, and communicating results.

Topics may include: research in practice, combining/working across disciplines, overcoming challenges, and successes!

Format of presentations:  

  • Context and interdisciplinary practice: Up to 12 minutes to present and 3 minutes for questions.
  • Self: Short, informal talks (around 5 minutes in length) to focus on personal experiences of research. Designed to enable discussion of issues related to emotions and wellbeing. We encourage presenters to deviate from a typical academic presentation for this theme, therefore use of slides is optional.

Please send a 300 word (maximum) abstract to ridnet@leeds.ac.uk by the 2nd of December, 2016.

 

The Researchers in Development Network, or RiDNet, is a student led network of PhD students and early career researchers working in international development and/or conducting social research in developing countries.  Our annual conference aims to give students and early career researchers a chance to share experiences, ideas and methods.

Call for Abstracts – 5th Annual RiDNet conference

This entry was posted in Conferences, Leeds, Research.

Phd student masterclass at the University of Manchester

Masterclass with Prof Nic van de Walle, Cornell – 17 November, 15:30-17:00
The masterclass with Prof van de Walle will take place on Thursday, 17 November 2016, from 15:30-17:00 at the University of Manchester, in the Arthur Lewis Building (Oxford Road) Ground Floor, G.030/031.

Prof Nicolas van de Walle is the Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Government and the Chair of the Department of Government at Cornell University. His primary field is comparative politics. His teaching and research focuses on the political economy of development, with a special focus on Africa, on democratization, and on the politics of economic reform.

His current main project looks into the impact of colonialism on contemporary African development, which is also the topic of the masterclass. The masterclass will embed this question into a general discussion of how to think about history for contemporary international development, itself a way to discuss prominent work by authors such as Acemoglu/Robinson, Mahoney, and Iyer. Based on the readings circulated ahead of the session, participants will have ample opportunity to discuss Nic’s work with him.

Applications to participate
Applications to participate in the masterclass should be sent to judith.krauss@manchester.ac.uk.
Applicants MUST include:
– the School and discipline area in which you work
– year of PhD study,
– a brief paragraph stating how your research is relevant to, or will benefit from, the masterclass.

Places are limited, so please apply promptly and by Thursday, 10 November, at the latest.

This entry was posted in Research.

Finding Africa seminar series 2016-17 CfP: African Feminisms

Finding Africa 2016/17 (UK) – African Feminisms

African feminisms have, from the beginning, been grounded in an inclusive and intersectional discourse which seeks to challenge and unravel patriarchal, political, existential, and philosophical imbalances in society. As such they have been instrumental in bringing into question some of the ‘blind spots’ and prejudices embedded in Western feminisms. In light of current debates on decolonisation and the continued interest in intersectional politics in the global sphere, Finding Africa invites researchers to propose papers which centre on the theme of African feminisms in any field of the humanities.

Accepted submissions from the UK will comprise the lineup of the next round of seminars co-hosted with the University of Leeds’ Centre for African Studies (LUCAS) in 2017. A second call for submissions from South Africa will be made shortly.

Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

Intersectionality and African Feminisms

Womanism in Contemporary African Feminism

The Future of African Feminisms

Human Rights and African Feminism

African Feminisms and Curricula

Contemporary African Feminisms

African Feminisms in the West

Philosophy and African Feminisms

African Feminist Manifestos

The Psychology of African Feminisms

African Feminist Literature

African Feminisms and Disability

Guide for authors:

All submissions should be 250 word abstracts in Word format emailed to findingpocoafrica@gmail.com by 20 November 2016.

This entry was posted in Finding Africas, LUCAS, Research, Seminars.

US Slavery and Yorkshire Anti-Slavery – forgotten narratives from the Leeds Archive

Leeds Being Human Festival 2016, Journeys of Hope and Fear – “US Slavery and Yorkshire Anti-Slavery: forgotten Narratives from the Leeds Archive”.

A country wide event in conjunction with University of Leeds and Joe Williams of Heritage Corner.  17th – 25th November 2016

If you were living in Leeds in the 1840s and 1850s you would undoubtedly have heard of the anti-slavery speeches made to huge local audiences by African American activists and their supporters. We start with a guided walk in which you will visit sites associated with the entwined histories of African self-emancipation and anti-slavery activism in nineteenth-century Leeds. After this, there will be a public discussion at the University of Leeds on the significance of the archives of anti-slavery activism. Finally, there will be a chance to visit the Leeds Library, founded in 1768. There you can see an exhibition from the Leeds Library’s collections on activist, onetime library member and Quaker businessman Wilson Armistead (1819-1868), and other Leeds abolitionists. Enjoy a play tracing the extraordinary escape, from enslavement in Georgia, of Ellen and William Craft. The couple were each listed in the 1851 census as a ‘fugitive slave’ when they were hosted by Armistead in his home in Leeds. They went on to publish an acclaimed book, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860).

The guided walk, public lecture and play “Meet the Crafts” will all take place on 23rd November:

The guided walk is from 1.15-3.15 setting off from the steps of the Parkinson building, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, LS2 9JT.

The public lecture will be at the University of Leeds, from 4.00-5.30pm.

“Meet the Crafts” will be performed at the Leeds Library, 18 Commercial Street, Leeds, LS1 6AL. The performance will start at 7.00pm and last for approximately one hour.

All the events are free and open to the public, but booking is essential. To book a place please contact counter@theleedslibrary.org.uk or telephone 0113 2453071.

 

This entry was posted in History, Lecture, Research, Theatre.

Jörg Wiegratz and David Whyte on how neoliberalism’s moral order feeds fraud and corruption

Crossposted from here

In a recent article on The Conversation, and  argue that corporate fraud is not just present, but is widespread in many neoliberalised economies of both income-rich and income-poor countries. They highlight Volkswagen’s emissions cheating scandal as perhaps the most recent and most startling example, but say that the automobile industry is only one of many sectors, including banking and the arms industry, where scandals have become commonplace. Certain practices and norms that many people in the global North considered shocking only a while ago have become routine in public life.

David Whyte and Jörg Wiegratz are editors of Neoliberalism and the Moral Economy of Fraud, published by Routledge this month. Contributors are from a range of disciplines including sociology, anthropology and political science, social policy and economics. There are three Africa specific chapters: ‘Entrepreneurialism, Corruption and Moral Order in the Criminal Justice System of the Democratic Republic of Congo’, by Maritza Felices-Luna (Ottawa); ‘Murder for gain: Commercial insurance and moralities in South Africa’, by Erik Bähre (Leiden), and ‘Seeking God’s Blessings: Pentecostal Religious Discourses, Pyramidal Schemes and Money Scams in the Southeast of Benin Republic’, by Sitna Quiroz (Durham). Other chapters have country case studies from Latin America, Western and Eastern Europe and Central Asia.  For interested readers: the introduction of the book ‘Neoliberalism, Moral economy and Fraud’ is available for free on the book website (see Look Inside function). Routledge has offered a 20% discount up to the end of the year (code: FLR40) for individuals purchasing print copies via the publisher’s website.

LUCAS and POLIS provided financial support to the international workshop in Leeds which led to the production of this book.

Read The Conversation article here.

This entry was posted in LUCAS, Research, Workshop.

Leeds Migration Research Network (LMRN) launch

Leeds Migration Research Network: Launch Event

Thursday 9 Jun at 4pm, University of Leeds

The University of Leeds Migration Research Network would like to invite you to our launch event, involving a public lecture and drinks reception. Please note you need to book a place should you wish to attend (free of charge) so please click on the eventbrite link below. All welcome.

Public lecture: Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration

Professor Bridget Anderson

Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford

Thursday June 9 2016

16:00-17:30 (followed by drinks reception)

Leeds University Business School, Maurice Keyworth Building, Lecture Theatre G.02  –  LS6 1AN

Please book your place (FREE) at: leedsmigrationlaunchevent.eventbrite.co.uk

At this launch event for the Leeds Migration Research Network (LMRN), Professor Bridget Anderson from the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford will present the following lecture: ‘Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration’. The talk will be followed by a drinks reception.

Building on inter-disciplinary expertise and interest in migration across the University of Leeds, LMRN is responding to the widespread interest in migration in the region and beyond, including government, business, and civil society groups. LMRN develops and promotes research around migration, and also deepens links with external organisations by acting as a contact point and source of expertise, and through the development of bottom-up collaborative engagement.

This entry was posted in Lecture, Research.

© Copyright Leeds 2017