Centre for African Studies (LUCAS)

General enquiries

Leeds University Centre for African Studies
c/o POLIS,
Social Sciences Building,
University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT

Tel: 0113 343 5069
african-studies@leeds.ac.uk

LUCAS Schools Project coordinator

Richard Borowski
R.Borowski@leeds.ac.uk

Symposium

The Battle of Algiers: Screening and Symposium

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

From ‘Yesterday’s Mujahiddin’ to today’s Postcolonial Classroom

A screening and symposium at the University of Leeds

Friday 4 May 2018

Hosted by the Centre for World Cinemas and Digital Cultures (CWCDC) and the Iqbal Centre for the Study of Contemporary Islam.

The event is free and all are welcome. However, space is limited for the afternoon session, so please sign up (afternoon session only) on the Eventbrite page at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-battle-of-algiers-1966-from-yesterdays-mujahiddin-to-todays-postcolonial-classroom-tickets-44631242247?aff=es2

Times and venues

Morning session (screening and discussion) 09:30-13:00: Roger Stevens Lecture Theatre 14: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/campusmap?location=5162
Afternoon Session (academic presentations and roundtable) 13:00-17:30: Leeds Humanities Research Institute (LHRI), 29-31 Clarendon Place:http://www.leeds.ac.uk/campusmap?location=5099

Programme

 Morning session: screening and discussion (Roger Stevens Lecture Theatre 14)

Participants are asked to read Nicholas Harrison’s article ‘Yesterday’s Mujahiddin: Gillo Pontecorvo’s The Battle of Algiers’, in R. Weaver-Hightower and P. Hulme (eds), Postcolonial Film (London: Routledge, 2014), pp. 23-46. The article is available to download here:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jXOYr2NmbxJqLbBt7xUXDzKzyJTW10gE/view?usp=sharing

09:30   Introduction

09:45   Screening of new restoration of The Battle of Algiers (Cult Films 2018)

12:00   Discussion: Islam in The Battle of Algiers

Chair Dr Mustapha Sheikh (Co-director Iqbal Centre for the Study of Contemporary Islam, Leeds)

Discussants

Dr Fozia Bora (Lecturer in Middle Eastern History and Islamic History, Leeds)

Prof Nicholas Harrison (Professor of French and Postcolonial Studies, King’s College London)

Prof S Sayyid (Professor of Social Theory and Decolonial Thought, Leeds)

Afternoon session: academic presentations and roundtable (LHRI)

13:15   Buffet lunch (provided)

13:45   Introduction

14:00   Presentations

Chair Dr Tajul Islam (Co-director Iqbal Centre for the Study of Contemporary Islam, Leeds)

14:00     Presentation 1 Prof Alan O’Leary (Professor of Film and Cultural Studies, Leeds): ‘The Battle of Algiers and the Orientalist Tradition’. RespondentProf S Sayyid (Professor of Social Theory and Decolonial Thought, Leeds)

14:45     Presentation 2 Dr Neelam Srivastava (Reader in Postcolonial and Comparative Literature, Newcastle): The Battle of Algiers in the Postcolonial Classroom’. Respondent Beatrice Ivey (Postgraduate Researcher in French, Leeds)

15:30     Presentation 3 Dr Carl Vincent (Principal Lecturer of Classical Music, Leeds College of Music): ‘East and West: Music in The Battle of Algiers’.Respondent TBC

16:15   Coffee break

16:30   Roundtable

                Chair Dr Neelam Srivastava (Reader in Postcolonial and Comparative Literature, Newcastle)

Participants

Dr Laura Ager (Co-director/programmer, Leeds Film Fringe)

TBC Prof Martin Evans (Professor of Modern European History, Sussex)

Prof Nicholas Harrison (Professor of French and Postcolonial Studies, King’s College London)

Prof John Mowitt (Leadership Chair in Critical Humanities, Leeds)

Prof S Sayyid (Professor of Social Theory and Decolonial Thought, Leeds)

17:30   End

This event has been generously supported by the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies (Leeds), and the Society for Italian Studies. It has been convened by Alan O’Leary in consultation with Neelam Srivastava and organised with the assistance of Rachel Johnson (Postgraduate Researcher, Leeds).

This entry was posted in Film, Journal, Leeds, Symposium.

CfP: Women of the Global South and its Diasporas: Rights, Representation, Activism Symposium

From the Women’s Paths Research Group:

Call for Papers

Women of the Global South and its Diasporas: Rights, Representation, Activism Symposium

5th of June 2018

Deadline for abstracts: Monday April 16th 2018

Women’s Paths is a research group based at University of Leeds. It was established in 2015 by feminist researchers from a variety of disciplines to bridge the gap between women’s issues in the community and feminist scholarship. This year’s focus is to promote intersectional feminism and issues that particularly effect BAME women. Our seminar series has explored transwomen and feminism, violence against women and Caribbean feminisms thus far.

Women’s Paths’ symposium aims to explore how feminist scholarship and practice might coalesce to create real change for women of the Global South, including in the diaspora. This symposium is an important platform to hear and discuss urgent issues, challenges, initiatives and achievements which are significant to the lives of women of colour. We bring together scholars researching across a range of disciplines to form a multidisciplinary approach to how we might cooperatively confront a multiplicity of experiences and issues. The scope of this symposium includes, but is not restricted to the following topics:

· Global Feminist Theories, Politics and Activism

· Intersections of identities (i.e. religion, disability, gender- particularly trans and non-binary)

· Discrimination and human rights violations

· Environmentalism and sustainable development

· Development and decolonisation

· Sexuality and reproductive rights (LGBTQIA, sexual health, cultural, social and economic issues)

· Resistance through creativity (performance, art, literature, spirituality, love, Afrofuturism, black joy)

Abstract Guidelines

We invite academic papers, practise-based reflections, and creative performances responding to the theme. If you wish to present a paper, we invite you to submit an abstract. The length of the abstract should not exceed 250 words. It should be written in English, in format Times New Roman, pt. 12 and submitted via email: (to Amber Lascelles: enall@leeds.ac.uk and Ope Adegbulu: lwoad@leeds.ac.uk)

In the abstract header, please include a short bio.

The abstract should contain the following elements:

· The subject of the paper

· The aim of the paper

· Themes that would be covered by the paper (3-4) key words)

Deadline for abstracts: Monday April 16th 2018

Our symposium is funded by the Postcolonial Studies Association, the British Sociological Association’s Migration, Diaspora and Transnationalism Study Group, and the School of Law at the University of Leeds. A number of travel bursaries will be provided.

Women’s Paths look forward to bringing people together for a pertinent symposium addressing women’s rights. We hope to build lasting connections between academics, PhD researchers and activists to inspire action and create change.

This entry was posted in Conferences, Leeds, Symposium.

Remembering Darcus Howe – film showing of The Mangrove Nine

Remembering Darcus Howe film showing of The Mangrove Nine – Wednesday 28 June, 7.30pm Mandela Centre, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 3HY

Darcus Howe (1943-2017) was perhaps the most prominent radical black journalist and activist in the post-war period in the UK. He opened the Mandela Centre on Chapeltown Road in Leeds in 1984. This event will discuss his legacy for international politics today.

Darcus made a huge impact when he defended himself in court in 1971 on trumped-up charges against people supporting The Mangrove restaurant in Notting Hill. He became editor of the magazine Race Today in the early 1970s and co-edited (with Tariq Ali) Channel 4’s Bandung File in the 1980s. Later he presented the programme Devil’s Advocate and led documentaries on black Britain. He was a columnist for the New Statesman.

At this event a screening of the documentary film The Mangrove Nine (made by his comrades Franco Rossi and John la Rose, 1974) will be followed by a panel discussion led by Arthur France MBE. Arthur was a friend of Darcus’s. He was a leading figure in the Black Power movement in Leeds in the 1960s and 70s, a founder of the Leeds West Indian Carnival, and he continues to struggle for black people’s rights to justice, equality and education.

Robin Bunce, co-author of the official biography of Darcus Howe, will be on the panel. Details of his book are here http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/darcus-howe-9781849666510/

Darcus, like Arthur, was an advocate for the politics and art of the Trinidad carnival and this event will include a special calypso in tribute to Darcus Howe written by the famous calypsonian Alexander D Great.

The event is free, but a collection will be made. It is sponsored by Leeds Stand Up To Racism, Remember Oluwale, Conversations in Black History (Leeds University) and Leeds TUC.

https://www.facebook.com/events/235013870334194/

 

This entry was posted in Film, History, Leeds, LUCAS, Research, Symposium.

CfP: Symposium on Foreign Aid and Journalism in Latin America and Africa

Symposium on Foreign Aid and Journalism in Latin America and Africa: Developing a Research Agenda

Leeds, UK – April 20, 2017

Call for Papers

Objective: This symposium will examine the influence and impact over the years of foreign aid on journalism practice and education. In so doing, it aims at developing a research agenda to examine issues and problems arising from the intersection between journalism, foreign aid, public diplomacy and foreign policy in historical and current contexts. Although the geographical focus is Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, we will welcome scholarly contributions from other areas of the Global South. The format of the event is explorative and therefore full papers are not necessary at this stage. The idea is to discover opportunities for collaborative research including joint research grants and publications as well as other types of exchanges.

The symposium connects to the initial meeting of the AHRC / DfID funded Research Network “Development Assistance and independent journalism in Africa and Latin America”.

Questions that the project aims at addressing include (but are not limited to)

  • What has been the role of international development assistance in shaping journalistic approaches and practices in Africa and Latin America and what are the consequences?
  • What is the existing body of research concerning this issue?
  • What has been the role of development assistance in shaping journalism education in Africa and Latin America?
  • To what extent has international development assistance fostered or inhibited independent journalism in Africa and Latin America?
  • What are the similarities and differences in the direct and indirect impacts of development assistance of journalism from the US, UK and other donors?
  • What are the continuities and discontinuities concerning the impact of development assistance on journalism practice and education in the post-Cold War era?
  • How has international development assistance either directly or indirectly affecting journalism been perceived by journalists, politicians and the general public in the beneficiary countries?
  • What interventions could be developed to counter any negative consequences of these traditions?

Planned outcomes:

  • Edited Special Issue of a Journal
  • Edited collection of essays in a book.
  • Joint grant applications
  • Collaborative PhD scholarships

Convenors: Dr Jairo Lugo-Ocando & Dr. Chris Paterson, School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds

Send abstracts to: c.paterson@leeds.ac.uk

Deadline for 300-words abstracts and title: February 20, 2017

Please register here: https://ajn-symposium.eventbrite.co.uk

This entry was posted in Conferences, Leeds, Research, Symposium.

The Legacy of Tony Blair

Dept. of Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

University of Leeds presents:

The Killings of Tony Blair                                                                           

Film showing followed by audience discussion

Tues. Nov. 1, 6.00-9.00 pm.                                                                     

Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre, Michael Sadler Building                        

with George Galloway, Peter Oborne, Stephen Fry, Will Self, Clare Short, David Davis, Noam Chomsky, Craig Murray, Seamus Milne, Matthew Norman, Ken Livingstone.

“A meticulous documentation of […] the catastrophic and illegal invasion of Iraq, the deaths of perhaps a million people and the region being plunged into sectarian chaos” (The Spectator)

“Presented with such avarice and duplicity, the stomach churns and the mind recoils” (Culture Whisper)

“Sanctimonious documentary” (The Guardian)

“If you need a nauseating reminder of why so many Brits feel alienated from the political centre, here it is” (Time Out)

                                                                                                                      

 

Tony Blair: Avarice, Aggression, Aftermath

Panel presentations followed by audience questions

Wed. Nov. 2, 6.00-9.00 pm.

Business School, Western Lecture Theatre, G.01

Speakers:

•   Blair and the Middle East: the Aftermath

     Dr. Jack Holland, POLIS

•   Blair, Neoliberalism and the Rise of Corbyn

     Prof. Salman Sayyid, School of Sociology

•   Blair, Sleaze and the Revolving Business-Politics Door

     Hasan Hafidh, Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

•  Blair, the Israel Lobby and Israel/Palestine

    Dr. Sarah Marusek, Department of Religion Studies, University of Johannesburg

For further information, contact

Prof. James Dickins: J.Dickins@leeds.ac.uk

Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

University of Leeds

 

All welcome

 

These events are intended to promote civic debate of the issues raised. The views expressed are those of the filmmakers and speakers, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the University of Leeds.


This entry was posted in Film, Symposium.

Symposium on British and American foreign policy in the Middle East

British and American policy in the Middle East: causes and consequences for the region and beyond
 
Leeds University Symposium: Saturday, April 23 2016
10.00 am – 5.00 pm
Room: Parkinson Seminar Room  1.08
 
Confirmed speakers
1. Afzal Amin                                        Formerly chairman of the Armed Forces Muslim Association, and visiting researcher and lecturer for the UK Defence Academy‘s Research and Assessment Branch
                                                                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afzal_Amin
 
2. Dr. Chris Davidson                      Reader in Middle East Politics, University of Durham:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/sgia/profiles/?id=4422 
 
3. Ann Feltham                                   Campaign against Arms Trade:               
https://blog.caat.org.uk/author/ann/ 
 
4. Prof. Rosemary Hollis                  Professor of International Politics, City University; formerly Director of Research at Chatham House (Royal Institute of International Affairs) https://www.city.ac.uk/people/academics/rosemary-hollis                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary_Hollis
 
5. Sir John Jenkins                              Executive Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies – Middle East; formerly British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia: https://www.iiss.org/en/persons/john-s-jenkins                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Jenkins_(diplomat)
                                                                 
6. Dr. Bobby Sayyid                           Reader in Sociology, University of Leeds: http://www.sociology.leeds.ac.uk/people/staff/sayyid             
                                                                 
 
All are welcome to attend this symposium which seeks to explore British and American policy in the Middle East, the factors that have driven this policy, and the consequences – both for the Middle East and for people in the West.
 
The Middle East is one of the least democratic and most militarised areas of the world. As the centre of world oil production, it is also of global strategic importance. For decades Western policy in the region has arguably been dominated by a number of factors: alliance with Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states (as the world’s biggest oil producers), unswerving support for Israel, and concomitant Western hostility towards Iran.
 
The 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq led to profound changes: the sectarianisation of Iraqi politics, a Shiite-led Iraqi government with close links to Iran, the emergence of a semi-independent Kurdish region in the north, and a subsequent civil war, with Iran supporting the Iraqi government and Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states supporting Sunni rebels.
 
In 2011, the Arab Spring led to further massive changes. Following pro-democracy uprisings across the Middle East, dictatorial regimes were overthrown in Tunisia and, for a while, Egypt. In Syria, what began as a popular uprising against the Assad regime quickly turned into a sectarian civil war, with the West, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states supporting Sunni rebels, and Iran, its Lebanese ally Hizbollah and latterly Russia supporting the Assad regime. As in Iraq, a semi-independent Kurdish region has emerged in northern Syria – considered by the Turkish government a threat to the Turkish state itself, as the country’s own very large Kurdish minority increasingly seeks autonomy.
 
In Yemen, as in Syria, what was originally a popular uprising has given way to civil war, with Saudi Arabia leading an international force against rebels which it regards as allied to Iran. And in Israel/Palestine the conflict, which the United States had proposed for decades would be ended by a two-state solution, now looks increasingly unresolvable with massive Israeli colonisation of Palestinian lands.
 
Across the Arab world, the economic situation world remains precarious, with oil revenues in Saudi Arabia, for example, constituting 90% of GDP. The collapse of oil prices since 1915, though caused by increased Saudi oil production, now threatens the country itself with economic crisis, and possible further instability across the Arabian Peninsula.
 
While the 2015 Iran nuclear deal eased US-Iranian tensions, it has exacerbated those between Saudi Arabia and Iran. US-Russian tensions, originally focused on Ukraine, are also being played out in the Middle East, as possibly decisive Russian intervention since 2015 on behalf of a de facto alliance between the Assad regime and Kurdish rebels in Syria leads to the re-emergence of Russia as a regional actor.
 
In Europe, a secondary consequence of conflict in the Middle East has been a vast influx of refugees, straining the political consensus which has been built up since the Second World War, and even threatening the future of the European Union. The Middle East conflicts have also exacerbated religious and racial tensions between non-Muslims and Muslims in Western Europe.
 
This seminar will address these issues which are vital importance to us all today. We do hope you can attend.
 
 
Organising Committee
Dr. Fozia Bora                                       University of Leeds
Prof. James Dickins                              University of Leeds
Mr. Chris Foren                                    Leeds Crown Prosecutor (retired)
Dr. Tajul Islam                                       University of Leeds
Dr. Hendrik Kraetzschmar                  University of Leeds
Dr. Mustapha Sheikh                           University of Leeds

 

This entry was posted in Conferences, Research, Symposium.

CfP: Postcolonial Education: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in and after Empire

The Fourth Biannual Northern Postcolonial Network Symposium

‘Postcolonial Education: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in and after Empire’

University of Leeds and Leeds Beckett University, June 17th 2016, in association with the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies and the Centre for Culture and the Arts. Co-organised by Dr Matthew Whittle, Dr Rachel Bower, Dr Jonathan Saha and Dr Emily Zobel Marshall with NPN

FREE Attendance

Call for Papers: Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Roundtable

The Fourth Biannual Northern Postcolonial Network Symposium will concentrate on the topic of ‘Postcolonial Education’. Taking place on Friday 17th June 2016, at theRose Bowl (5th Floor, Room 513) the day will bring together academic and non-academic audiences to debate the current and very pressing issues of teaching, learning and schooling in and after Empire. The focus is therefore on conversation rather than on the delivery of formal academic papers. The one-day symposium encourages educators and students – both broadly defined – to reflect on issues of teaching postcolonial histories and literatures in schools, universities, activist networks, and community organisations. Building on current debates about ‘decolonising education’ (evident in the Rhodes Must Fall and Why Is My Curriculum White? campaigns) we will explore the formative role of education during colonial rule and in postcolonial contexts through a set of interactive roundtables and workshops. Contributors are encouraged to think through the continuities and breaks with the past, and the implications of this for addressing issues such as race and migration in teaching, student experiences and/or the development of curriculum today.

The conference is particularly keen to facilitate wider and more inclusive forms of participation than traditional academic conferences. To this end, postgraduate and early career researchers, educators outside of higher education, community activists, as well as creative performers, will be key participants. We can also confirm that there will be a screening of the film Sugar Cane Alley, which is based on the autobiographical book by the Martican writer Joseph Zobel. This will be accompanied by an introduction and Q&A with Zobel’s granddaughter, Dr Emily Zobel Marshall.  Additional confirmed contributors include Dr Claire Chambers (York)Dr Kate Houlden (Anglia Ruskin) and Dr Sarah Lawton Welsh (York St John).

We warmly invite postgraduates and early career researchers to submit a 200-word abstract for a short piece of work to be discussed as part of a roundtable at the start of the symposium. Priority will be given to proposals that speak to the symposium topics and that keep a public audience in mind. To reap the full benefits of discussion on the day, full versions of papers (up to 1500 words) will be circulated to attendees three weeks prior to the symposium. For the roundtable itself, each presenter will prepare a brief (5-minute) introduction based on the pre-circulated piece.

Please submit a paper proposal of 200 words to the symposium organisers at northernpoconetwork@gmail.com by Friday 25th March 2016.

Notices of acceptance: Friday 25th April 2016

Deadline for full papers: Friday 20th May 2016 (up to 1500 words)

Full papers pre-circulated: Friday 3rd June 2016

Events

This entry was posted in Conferences, History, Research, Symposium.

Religion, Homosexuality and LGBT Rights in Africa Symposium

Religion, Homosexuality and LGBT Rights in Africa Symposium
University of Leeds, 7 April, 1pm

This symposium celebrates the launch of two book volumes, co-edited by Ezra Chitando and Adriaan van Klinken, and published with Ashgate in spring 2016:
Public Religion and the Politics of Homosexuality in Africa.
Christianity and Controversies over Homosexuality in Africa.

Speakers
Dr Barbara Bompani, University of Edinburgh
Prof Ezra Chitando, University of Zimbabwe
Rev Jide Macaulay, House of Rainbow Ministries
Dr Adriaan van Klinken, University of Leeds
Dr Matthew Waites, University of Glasgow
WHEN
Thursday, 7 April 2016 from 13:00 to 17:00 (BST) – Add to Calendar
WHERE
University of Leeds – Old Mining Building, room G.19. Woodhouse lane. Leeds LS2 9JT GB – Register at this link here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/religion-homosexuality-and-lgbt-rights-in-africa-symposium-tickets-21630672925?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing

This entry was posted in Book Launch, LUCAS, Research, Symposium.

© Copyright Leeds 2018